This was Bysiewicz’s third candidacy since 2010. That year began with an announcement by Democratic Sen. Christopher Dodd that he wouldn’t run again. His decision to leave office opened a rare season of political upward mobility for ambitious state Democrats, and it reshuffled their deck. Attorney General Richard Blumenthal ran for Senate, state Rep. Denise Merrill ran for secretary of the state, and Susan Bysiewicz ran for governor.

At first.

But she later changed her mind and decided she’d be better qualified for the job Blumenthal was leaving — attorney general. The problem was, though, that she was not qualified to run. The Connecticut Supreme Court agreed, in a unanimous ruling, that Bysiewicz lacked the required experience as a practicing attorney needed, by law, for the job.


Then, in early 2011, independent Sen. Joseph Lieberman said he would not seek a fifth term. Bysiewicz decided to run for the open seat, branding herself as the candidate who could hold Wall Street accountable, create jobs and protect the middle class.  But polls over the summer showed that message wasn’t resonating with voters.

And on Tuesday, the primary vote tallies told the same story.




Speaking at the Mattabesett Canoe Club in Middletown, Bysiewicz said…



-i’ll get her quotes

-quotes of others on the end, for now, of a political career