Rich senator, poor senator

Washington — According to the latest financial disclosures filed in the U.S. Senate, Sen. Richard Blumenthal is among the richest and Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., continues to be one of the poorest members in that chamber  — although he has a lot of cash in the bank.

Financial disclosure reports for 71 senators were released on Friday.

Murphy continues to report owing on college loans that are more than 15 years old for himself and his wife. The loans were valued at between $15,001 and $50,000 each. Since the amounts of assets and liabilities are reported in broad ranges, it’s hard to pinpoint the exact wealth of a member of Congress.

Murphy listed three college savings accounts — each worth less than $15,000 — and three IRA’s, one worth less than $50,000 and the other two worth less than $15,000.

He also listed a 30-year mortgage of between $250,001 and $500,000 for his home in Cheshire. The interest rate on that mortgage is 5.25 percent.

But it’s not all debt.  Murphy has a lot of cash in a joint USAA checking account, between $100,001 and $250,000.

Murphy reported that his wife earned more than $1,000 working for Connecticut Legal Services last year. He also said he sits on the advisory board of the Susan B. Anthony Project in Torrington, a nonprofit that helps victims of domestic and sexual abuse.

Blumenthal did not file his financial disclosure form by a May 15 deadline, preferring instead to ask for an extension. An analysis of 2012 financial disclosure forms by the newspaper Roll Call, placed Blumenthal as the 4th richest member of the Congress, with a net worth of about $53 million.  “Blumenthal’s wealth stems in part from his wife, Cynthia Blumenthal, who is the daughter of New York real estate magnate Peter Malkin,” Roll Call said.

Financial disclosure reports for member of the House of Representatives will be released next month.

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