Your search for node/"Dan Esty" returned 19 results

All’s well that ends well in energy — maybe

The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority — the state’s first-in-the-nation green bank –- could wind up getting back all of the $30.4 million commandeered for general revenue. And all $5 million from the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative that was to be diverted to general revenue from energy efficiency programs is once again destined for energy efficiency.

Widespread dissatisfaction with energy bill process and changes to renewable power

Plans to rush major energy legislation through the General Assembly as soon as Wednesday are raising cries of foul from dozens of normally unaligned groups. Their concerns are prompted in part by timing: It’s two months before the draft report most of the legislation is based on finishes its required public review.

Shoreline Task Force recommendations face financial and other difficulties

A year ago, with the destruction of Tropical Storm Irene still raw, Rep. James Albis, D-East Haven, took a look at computer modeling that showed his district after a category 2 hurricane. It was pretty much underwater. So Albis suggested forming a task force to look at the spectrum of issues around managing the Connecticut coastline for what many believe are the new climate realities.

Microgrid project deadline nears. Do communities understand the concept?

Norwich – It was only for a few hours during Tropical Storm Irene, but the William W. Backus Hospital here still got a hard lesson on what losing power in the heat of summer meant. While the hospital has emergency generators, “they’re not large enough to power everything,” said Keith Fontaine, vice president and chief administrative officer. “There are red outlets all over the hospital that are for emergencies.

Shoreline infrastructure upgrades unlikely even after second storm in 14 months

Guilford — On a damp, dreary post-Sandy, post-add-insult-to-injury snowstorm afternoon, Guilford Town Planner George Kral surveyed the intersection of state road 146, also called Leetes Island Road, and Sachem’s Head Road. “It floods at extreme high tides under normal conditions and it floods even more significantly during storms,” he said, pointing to where 146 runs under a railroad bridge adjacent to a salt marsh. “During the recent Sandy, that road was closed under that bridge for several days because of the high water.”

New energy strategy focuses on natural gas and efficiency

Even before the Malloy administration’s release Friday morning of the state’s first Comprehensive Energy Strategy, concerns emerged among the environmental community and other organizations about a cornerstone of the plan — widespread conversion of homes and businesses to natural gas. Chief among them is that natural gas’s historic low prices will not last and that consumers could at some point face the same problem with gas that they now face with oil. “The thing of greatest concern — what appeared to us to be an extraordinarily mistaken impression — [is] that the current cheap natural gas prices, relative to what they were four years ago, are going to be that way for a very, very long time,” said Gene Guilford, president and CEO of the Independent Connecticut Petroleum Association.

State green bank chief: entrepreneurial spirit in a government suit

Bryan T. Garcia, the president of the Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority, calls himself a believer in the philosophy of hockey superstar Wayne Gretzky. “You miss 100 percent of the shots you never take,” Garcia quotes Gretzky as famously saying — and quotes him often.

Leader to address ‘dysfunction’ on energy committee

At least four major components of the omnibus energy bill that never made it to the floor of either chamber of the General Assembly in the just-completed annual legislative session are likely to make their way into the special session in two weeks. While the move is expected to rectify some key issues — in particular, the extension of funding to provide low-cost energy audits for oil-heated homes — many view it as mop-up for a failure that could have been avoided. Nardello and Fonfara consulting in 2010 during a thaw in their relationship.

Lead by example rolls out first projects

Shovels could be in the ground as early as this week for the first two projects of the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection’s inaugural energy efficiency initiative known as Lead By Example. OK — it’s not exactly shovels — more like unscrewing lightbulbs and moving air conditioners. But it’s happening all the same.

A push for transit-oriented development, but in what direction?

Transit oriented development — a generation-old concept in which municipal and economic growth are linked to mass transit — is a current darling among many Connecticut constituencies. Called T-O-D to those in the know, it’s championed by environmentalists for its carbon footprint-shrinking possibilities; economic and business interests for its work force-friendly components; transit advocates for its car-minimizing focus; planners for its integrated approach to how we live; and a host of others. TOD is unapologetically thrown around as the rationale behind the high-profile, though controversial projects of the New Britain to Hartford busway and the planned high-speed rail line from New Haven to Hartford to Springfield, Mass.

Microgrids offer potential for greater energy reliability

Easy to miss in the flurry around the Two Storms Panel report earlier this month was an idea called microgrids. A jargony techno-term, a microgrid is a small electric grid with its own generation source. It normally operates linked to the main electric grid, but when that suffers widespread interruptions, as Connecticut’s did during Tropical Storm Irene and the October snowstorm, a microgrid can automatically isolate itself and keep running.

DEEP hires first procurement manager

Connecticut Thursday became the second state in the nation to have a power procurement manager — with the announcement that the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection had hired Jeffrey Gaudiosi. The position was mandated in the huge energy bill passed during the last legislative session as way to get cheaper and cleaner energy to customers. Currently, procurement is done by the utilities themselves.

The bear truth

Barely a peep in the last few days on the possibility of a bear hunt in Connecticut, after a flurry of assertions one was in the works followed by a bunch of non-denial denials, and some generally vague answers that left all kinds of doors wide open. (In case you forgot where this all started — it was a few weeks back when an 82-year-old Windsor man killed a bear that had damaged his bird feeder.)
So we put it to Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Commissioner Dan Esty, whose deputies have done most of the talking so far. “We have no plans to have a bear hunt now,” he said.

The bear truth

Barely a peep in the last few days on the possibility of a bear hunt in Connecticut, after a flurry of assertions that one was in the works, followed by a bunch of non-denial denials, and some generally vague answers that left all kinds of doors wide open. (In case you forgot where this all started — it was a few weeks back when an 82-year-old Windsor man killed a bear that had damaged his bird feeder.)
So we put it to Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Commissioner Dan Esty, whose deputies have done most of the talking so far. “We have no plans to have a bear hunt now,” he said.

Big agenda, and a few battles, brewing for energy and environment in 2012

After the bumper 2011 legislative session, you might expect a modest wish list from Connecticut legislators, environmentalists and conservation advocates for 2012. Not happening. Nearly a year after those groups and the Malloy administration began an energy and environmental reform quest that resulted in the new Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, an unprecedented comprehensive energy bill designed to upend energy business as usual, scads of funding for clean water projects, commitments to open space and a host of other initiatives, all parties are back asking for more.