Environmental Protection Agency

Recent Posts

Q&A: EPA’s McCarthy hopes Trump won’t unravel her work

WASHINGTON — On Gina McCarthy’s watch, the Environmental Protection Agency toughened the clean water and clean air regulations and finalized regulations for the Clean Power Plan, which aims to reduce emissions from power plants to combat climate change. She recently gave The Connecticut Mirror a wide ranging interview and spoke, in her distinct Boston accent, of her hopes that her legacy will survive, Continue Reading →

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A shifting ground for artificial turf in Connecticut

A number of cancer cases around the country among young athletes who played on artificial turf fields made with a crumb rubber filler have spurred calls for further research into the safety of the fields. Continue Reading →

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Herbicide finding intensifies battle over GMO labeling

More than two years after passing the nation’s first law requiring labels on most foods containing genetically engineered components, there are still no labels for Genetically Modified Organisms – GMOs – in Connecticut or anywhere else in the U.S. But GMO labeling advocates now have some new ammunition for a counter-offensive. Continue Reading →

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A storm rages over CT’s stormwater

Managing the water that flows into the thousands upon thousands of storm drains around the state — an otherwise standard municipal function — has become something close to a standoff between the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection and a battalion of those municipalities. Continue Reading →

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Last-day legislative drama centers on Haddam land swap

With no major legislation remaining, the General Assembly was free today to mull and eventually approve the contentious Haddam land swap, one of the intensely personal issues, favors and grievances that add drama to the frenetic last day of every annual session. Bills are held to the last day for myriad reasons, often having nothing to do with content or merit. They are chips in a game, hostages to be exchanged as one chamber passes the others’ bills while the clock inches toward a midnight adjournment. The last day is when House members stand behind a brass rail in the Senate, waiting to see if their bills have been blessed with a place on the consent calendar, the upper chamber’s way of passing bills in batches on a single unanimous vote. Case in point: After debating a single budget bill for more than eight hours Tuesday, the Senate then passed 73 House bills at 11:25 p.m. on one consent calendar and two more 30 minutes later on a second. Continue Reading →

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