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Posted inCT Viewpoints

A new focus for Access Health CT: Creating a healthier Connecticut

Since the Affordable Care Act was signed into law six years ago, Access Health CT has been a national leader at implementing our state-based healthcare exchange and enrolling residents in quality, affordable health care coverage. Like other exchanges across America, we need to do more with less. As we develop our strategic goals for the next three years, AHCT is pivoting from an organization that focused primarily on getting residents enrolled to one providing intelligent solutions for individuals to access care at an affordable cost.

Posted inHealth

Yeah, CT health care costs are high, but which ones are highest?

The amount paid for a cesarean childbirth and newborn care in the hospital, for example, averaged $20,107 in Connecticut – 26 percent above the national average of $15,917, according to data based on claims paid by three private insurance companies. But costs also ranged within the state, averaging $20,773 in the Bridgeport area, $19,715 in the Hartford region, and $18,915 in and around New Haven.

Posted inCT Viewpoints

Government must help with Connecticut’s individual retirement security

Recently we have witnessed a disturbing shortfall in the effectiveness of government policies towards retirement security. Many businesses are eliminating or reducing the pension benefit notwithstanding government incentives. The IRA has not grown in coverage to make up the difference. Today nearly 50 percent of private sector workers are looking forward to an old age income that limited to just Social Security, which is inadequate to stay out of poverty. The Connecticut Retirement Security Board proposal to offer a state-run IRA with contributions through payroll deduction and with low fees would mostly repair the shortfall in Connecticut retirement savings.