K-12

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Here’s how Massachusetts helped one troubled school district improve

In Lawrence, a once-booming mill town that Boston Magazine labeled the “City of the Damned” five years ago, schools have shown remarkable improvement since the state intervened in 2011. Last of three stories in a special report. Continue Reading →

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Massachusetts spends less per poor student than we do and gets better results

In both states spending on education has increased greatly over the last 25 years – with one key difference: Massachusetts tied increased state aid to ambitious reforms it credits with spurring remarkable advances in student achievement. Connecticut relied more heavily on local educators to use increased state aid to improve things. Second of three stories in a special report. Continue Reading →

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Massachusetts is like Connecticut, but does a better job educating the poor

Massachusetts over the last 20 years has moved to the top of the national rankings for achievement by students from low-income families while Connecticut has lagged. Here’s how they did it. First of three articles in a special report. Continue Reading →

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Care4Kids resumes enrollment, but won’t reach previous highs

With the number of families receiving help to cover the costs of child care reaching record lows, state lawmakers this week celebrated an announcement that the state will start enrolling children on the wait list. However, opening the wait list does not mean that every applicant whose income qualifies them for help will receive a Care4Kids subsidy. Continue Reading →

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House sends veto-proof, bipartisan budget to Malloy

With the final flourish of a veto-proof margin, the House of Representatives voted Thursday to give final legislative passage to an overdue, bipartisan budget crafted without the direct involvement of Gov. Dannel P. Malloy. Continue Reading →

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After 117-day marathon, Senate passes bipartisan budget

The Senate took a major step early Thursday toward ending Connecticut’s nearly 17-week budget impasse, overwhelmingly adopting a $41.3 billion, two-year plan that closes huge deficits without raising income or sales tax rates, imposes modest cuts on local aid, and provides emergency assistance to keep Hartford out of bankruptcy. Continue Reading →

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Municipal aid: See how your town fares in the bipartisan budget

With more than three-quarters of overall state municipal aid currently going to the state’s primary education grant — the Education Cost Sharing (ECS) grant — it should be no surprise that it took the brunt of cuts this year. Various non-education grants will be cut next year to make up for restoring ECS funding in 2019. Continue Reading →

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Teachers would pay more for pensions, but big funding shortfalls would persist

After months of wrangling, legislative leaders settled on having public school teachers and other educators pay an additional 1 percent of their salary toward their pensions – a $775 yearly increase for the average teacher and school administrator. The increased contributions will barely make a dent in controlling the state’s pension costs, however. Continue Reading →

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