Election 2020

A Protect the Results protest in Hartford on Wednesday. Above, Joanna Lovino, of Hartford, shouts out “Silence is not an option” towards cars passing by in Hartford.
Al Mayo, of Gales Ferry, at Albany Avenue and Main Street in Hartford. “We’re here today to remind the state of Connecticut that we have an agenda, Black Lives Matter or social and racial justice,” Mayo said. “Regardless of who the president is, we’re gonna continue to keep fighting for what’s right.”
A passing driver cheers for Al Mayo, of Gales Ferry.
Mayo wore a mask he made himself and a body camera during the protest in Hartford. Mayo said he turns on his body camera everywhere he goes, except for at work as a firefighter, to protect himself from any false accusations as he protests.
Black Lives Matter protestors .“We want both the neighborhood and the elected officials to know that we will still be here no matter who is elected. I want my neighbors in the North End to know that they will not be forgotten, and I want the politicians and police to know that we are going to keep their feet to the fire,” said Joanna Lovino.
Black Lives Matter protestors stand with Black Lives Matter signs in Hartford. “We want both the neighborhood and the elected officials to know that we will still be here no matter who is elected. I want my neighbors in the North End to know that they will not be forgotten, and I want the politicians and police to know that we are going to keep their feet to the fire,” said Joanna Lovino, one of the participants.
Al Mayo, of Gales Ferry, protests at Albany Avenue and Main Street in Hartford. “We’re here today to remind the state of Connecticut that we have an agenda, Black Lives Matter or social and racial justice,” Mayo said. “Regardless of who the president is, we’re gonna continue to keep fighting for what’s right.”
D’Juan Eastman, of Farmington, said he made the sign with the baseball bat to reduce anxiety he feels when holding regular signs at a protest site. Eastman said he has suffered from PTSD after serving for the Marine Corps.
D’Juan Eastman's sign.
Alicia Ault, of New London, stands during the Black Lives Matter protest in Hartford. “It’s not political. It’s a humanity issue,” Ault said.
By Kasturi Pananjady