Recent Posts

A debate over how government should identify our ethnicity

Claire Liao, a 10 year old from Fairfield, with Ming Li, a mother of two from South Windsor.

Using more detailed ethnic categories in student and health data could allow policymakers to better serve small populations, but some people in those small populations are anxious about extra scrutiny, the possibility of discrimination and being labeled as other than American. Continue Reading →

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National unrest sharpens CT’s focus on police-community trust

Despite enacting some of the country’s most progressive police reforms, Connecticut still faces the same questions other states do about whether police are doing enough to enforce the law effectively without infringing on the civil rights of minorities, and if they are doing enough to build trust with their communities. Continue Reading →

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Introducing Vote Hound: In Connecticut, does one party really rule?

Most roll call votes in the Connecticut legislature are easy to analyze: They are either unanimous or follow party lines. Vote Hound helps you find and analyze the other kind of votes, the ones where the patterns are not quite so clear. Explore the latest interactive database from The Connecticut Mirror and Trend CT. Continue Reading →

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Special Report: Education, Diversity and Change in Fairfield County

Fairfield County, a region marked by sharp disparities in income and in urban and suburban life, faces particular challenges in assuring all its residents a quality education. Today, a special report, “Education, Diversity and Change in Fairfield County,” explores the issue through in-­depth policy reporting, interactive maps and charts, photo galleries and opinion pieces written by teachers from the Connecticut Writing Project at Fairfield University. Continue Reading →

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Connecticut plans to launch open data portal

Every time an inmate enters or leaves a correction facility in Connecticut, a database is updated so the state has an accurate count of its incarcerated population. And each day, those numbers are used to produce a chart on the state’s website. It’s one of the few state “datasets” that is updated daily for the public. But it takes persistence to find the chart because it’s buried on the website of the state’s Office of Policy and Management (OPM), and it exists nowhere else, including on other government websites with state criminal justice data. Continue Reading →

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