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Posted inCT Viewpoints

Black and brown people wait for justice in Connecticut

Connecticut prides itself being a progressive state. One peek into the Criminal Justice and Correctional system tells a story in contrast. It tells a story of deeply embedded structural and institutional racial disparity within every state organization. Although Connecticut is over 72% white every system that negatively impacts Connecticut society is predominantly Black and brown.  Clearly in Connecticut the arc of the moral universe is slow to bend toward justice.

Posted inCT Viewpoints

Complicity over Northern Correction Institution

News of the closing of Northern CI left many within the social justice community elated. Weeks ago, then-acting Commissioner Angel Quiros publicly stated at least two prisons would be closing. Many of us felt it made sense that Northern would be on the short list, especially with recent news surrounding it. It has faced numerous lawsuits since its opening in 1995, one affirmed on the very day the commissioner was confirmed.

Posted inCT Viewpoints

Why is releasing prisoners early during this pandemic a no-no?

News sources have repeatedly stated the primary way to avoid widespread infection of COVID-19 is through social practicing and intense sanitizing.  We all know neither is possible within jails and prisons. It has also been consistently reported that African- Americans and Latinos are at greater risk of death from the virus which is ravishing America. With that said, Connecticut’s prison population is disproportionately African-American and Latino.

Posted inCT Viewpoints

More must be done to humanize Connecticut criminal justice

After months of tireless work to bring awareness to state legislators about the harm associated with solitary confinement, a bill was passed that doesn’t even scratch the surface of what must happen to humanize criminal justice in this state. When states as notorious for prisoner abuse as California and Texas are making changes in prisoner treatment, one must wonder why Connecticut is lagging behind.