Housing inequality can be both cause and effect of poverty in wealthy CT

Not being able to afford a home in a suburban community is a common problem for many of Connecticut’s low-income residents, particularly people of color, because of the state’s longstanding and widespread lack of affordable housing. This disparity in the availability and quality of housing is one of the chief forces of division in modern society and both a cause and effect of poverty, experts say. Continue Reading →

Hayes raises about $1.3 million in her quest for congressional seat

WASHINGTON – Jahana Hayes, a political newcomer vying for the 5th District congressional seat, has pulled in nearly $1.3 million in campaign donations since she announced her candidacy in May. Some of that money came from political action committees representing special interests and from those Hayes hopes to call colleagues after the Nov. 6 elections, including House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi. Continue Reading →

Do magnet schools need white students to be great?

In the Hartford region, a difference in philosophies about whether segregation contributes to poor educational outcomes divides parents, educators and lawmakers. Most magnet schools have no problem attracting enough white students from the suburbs to go to school with city kids, but some struggle. This means seats in some schools are left open to maintain diversity – a reality that is causing a rift among neighbors about what should happen next. On Tuesday, a federal judge will consider whether the state must stop considering race when awarding seats. Continue Reading →

Bill to address racial disparities at Coast Guard Academy proposed as investigation continues

WASHINGTON – An investigation into the Coast Guard Academy’s treatment of minority cadets continues months after members of the U.S. House and Senate pressed the service for more information about racial disparities. The Coast Guard Academy’s poor rates of minority enrollment and graduation have prompted a lawmaker to introduce legislation that would change its admission policies and “culture” regarding minority cadets. Continue Reading →

‘Grossly unfair?’ Widower takes ban on military injury claims to Supreme Court

More than four years after Navy Lt. Rebekah Daniel bled to death within hours of childbirth at a Washington state military hospital, her husband still doesn’t know exactly how — or why — it happened. Walter Daniel, a former Coast Guard officer, demanded explanations from officials at the Naval Hospital Bremerton, where his wife, known as “Moani,” died on March 9, 2014. He says he got none. No results from a formal review of the incident, no details about how the low-risk pregnancy of a healthy 33-year-old woman — a labor and delivery nurse herself — ended in tragedy, leaving their newborn daughter, Victoria, now 4, without a mom. “There was no timeline, no records of what steps were taken,” recalled Daniel, 39, sitting in his Seattle lawyer’s high-rise office last month. Continue Reading →