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Posted inCT Viewpoints

Air quality better than last year, but Connecticut suit of midwestern states should continue

Last month the CT Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) released its report on the state of Connecticut’s environment. The report tracked the number of unhealthy air days there were in Connecticut last year. There were 17 bad air days, meaning that for over two weeks during the hot summer months Connecticut’s air was burdened with ground level ozone.

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If Connecticut wants to reduce its trash, it must expand the Bottle Redemption Bill

It’s been more than 40 years since Connecticut lawmakers enacted the CT Redemption Bottle Law, known as the “Bottle Bill.” The  CT  Bottle Bill became law in 1978, and at that time a five-cent deposit was put on the bottles of water, beer and soda. That same five- cent deposit remains today, 42 years later. In our present economy. the five-cent deposit fee is inadequate.

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Connecticut must require its large drinking water supply companies to test for PFAS

We cannot know whether PFAS are contaminating our drinking water unless the water is tested.  There is legislation now before the Connecticut Public Health Committee, HB 5288, requiring Connecticut’s drinking water supply companies test for PFAS. It is of the utmost importance that this bill becomes law, if we are to protect Connecticut’s citizens.

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Best of 2019: Waste tire rubber has no place around playing children

Connecticut landscape architects came out against a bill that would have protected our smallest children from dangerous playgrounds. Proposed Bill 7003 this year would have establish a moratorium on the use of crumb rubber mulch being used as a surfacing material in municipal and public school playgrounds.  Why was this bill proposed and why was it important for the health of our smallest children?

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E-cigarettes: If feds decline to act, Connecticut may have to

The federal government has announced that it will not allow any legislation that regulate e-cigarettes — a reversal of prior indications. The lobbyists for the e-cigarette companies have convinced the administration that their supporters like to vape — and therefore the administration will not allow any legislation that might curb the vaping epidemic. This announcement leaves the work of protecting the health of children, teenagers, and adults to the states.

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E-cigs latest example of product safety – public disconnect

There is a serious disconnect between what the public assumes to be the case and what the reality is when it comes to product safety.  Most people believe that if a product is on the market it has been proven to be safe.   There are numerous products that have been brought to market without proper testing that later have been proven to be harmful. The most recent example of this is e-cigarettes.

Posted inCT Viewpoints

Waste tire rubber has no place around playing children

Connecticut landscape architects came out against a bill that would have protected our smallest children from dangerous playgrounds. Proposed Bill 7003 this year would have establish a moratorium on the use of crumb rubber mulch being used as a surfacing material in municipal and public school playgrounds.  Why was this bill proposed and why was it important for the health of our smallest children?

Posted inCT Viewpoints

Connecticut lawmaker’s wages: $18 an hour

The Connecticut legislators are paid a salary of $28,000.  The state provides $5,500 yearly to senators and $4,500 to representatives for expenses they don’t have to document. If Connecticut had kept the legislators’ salaries concurrent with the inflation rates, the legislators salaries would now be $35,500 — but they are not – they are still at $28,000.  The Connecticut salaries for legislators were low 13 years ago — and they are even lower in buying power now.  Over the past 13 years, inflation rates have totaled 27 percent,  meaning that the  salaries of $28,000 now have a real worth today of $20,500.