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Posted inCities & Towns, Education, Health, Housing, Money, News, Politics, Transportation

Connecticut faces long crawl out of wealth extremes, crushing debt

Whether it’s expanding access to education and health care, rebuilding roads and cities or making taxes fairer, leaders have many ideas to reduce wealth inequality and promote prosperity. But they remain uncertain about how to solve this crisis while Connecticut simultaneously grapples with a historic debt burden that also threatens its future.

Posted inHousing

Housing inequality can be both cause and effect of poverty in wealthy CT

Not being able to afford a home in a suburban community is a common problem for many of Connecticut’s low-income residents, particularly people of color, because of the state’s longstanding and widespread lack of affordable housing. This disparity in the availability and quality of housing is one of the chief forces of division in modern society and both a cause and effect of poverty, experts say.

Posted inMoney

Among Connecticut cities and towns, the wealthiest are the big spenders

While Connecticut’s distressed cities often are perceived as having bloated budgets, the wealthy suburbs easily outspend their urban neighbors on a per capita basis, sometimes by margins nearing two-to-one. More importantly, shrinking state aid, a lack of revenue diversity and an over-reliance on a regressive property tax system threaten to widen tremendous disparities that already exist between Connecticut’s poorest and richest communities. Second in a series.

Posted inMoney

Already deep in debt, Connecticut struggles with extremes of wealth and income

The growing gap between Connecticut’s richest and poorest citizens, which already outstrips that in most other states, has widened dramatically since the last recession. While only the most affluent households improved their standing, the rest lost ground. How to address this inequality and a crushing state debt at the same time will be at the core of Connecticut’s political debate for years to come. First in a series.