Joe Markley

Recent Posts

Malloy seeks to cut legislative authority over Medicaid changes

Gov. Dannel P. Malloy’s administration is seeking to eliminate legislators’ authority over certain attempts to make changes to Medicaid and other federally funded assistance programs – an authority legislators recently used to block a controversial administration proposal. Continue Reading →

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A fight for the helm of a shrinking Connecticut GOP

Connecticut Republicans are to settle a wide-open race for state chairman Tuesday night at Nuchie’s, the banquet hall in Bristol where $26-per-person buys an overflowing buffet table, a cash bar and a guarantee, “You will never go wrong at Nuchie’s!” The GOP hopes so. Continue Reading →

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NRA fails to block judicial nomination of ‘anti-gunner’

The Connecticut legislature Friday ignored an NRA campaign to block the judicial nomination of a former legislator who co-sponsored the post-Newtown gun controls, voting overwhelmingly to confirm Auden C. Grogins of Bridgeport as a judge of the Superior Court. Continue Reading →

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Video: A CT Mirror/AARP conversation on caring for a rapidly aging state

Connecticut is old and getting older. One in seven residents is 75 or older, and the 65-plus population is projected to grow by 64 percent by 2030. Caring for an aging population was the topic Thursday of a Google Hangout, a conversation with Lt. Gov. Nancy Wyman, Sen. Joe Markley and Elaine Ryan of AARP. Continue Reading →

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At the State Capitol, a Tea Party of one

As the only avowed Tea Party adherent to win election in Connecticut, Joe Markley is a curiously laid-back representative of a movement known for its anger and frustration with government spending and policies. “I’ve not the hard-driving sort,” said Markley, who has degrees in English from Amherst and Columbia. “I’m a very relaxed firebrand.” Markley’s brand of small-government Republicanism has not sold well in Connecticut since 1984, when he and 11 other GOP challengers won state Senate seats on Ronald Reagan’s coattails, only to lose them two years later on a changing political tide. After an absence of 24 years, he’s coming back in January to take the same seat, allied with minority Republicans and the even smaller Tea Party, an anti-tax movement that failed to coalesce here into a coherent political vision or strategy. Continue Reading →

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