Fate of state’s school integration efforts rests with federal judge

BRIDGEPORT — A federal judge will soon determine whether his court should get involved in how the state awards enrollment to students in high-performing magnet schools located throughout Connecticut. At issue is whether the lottery’s algorithm – which is designed to limit enrollment of black and Hispanic students in a school to 75 percent – is discriminatory, and therefore a violation of the U.S. Constitution. Continue Reading →

Himes uses war chest to help other Dems, Arora raises less than $9k over summer

WASHINGTON – Democratic Rep. Jim Himes is spending more money on the races of other Democratic candidates than he is on his own, while his Republican challenger Harry Arora, raised less than $9,000 in campaign cash this summer. Himes donated to the campaigns of more than 70 House Democrats in the last quarter, the latest filings with the Federal Election Commission show.
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Housing inequality can be both cause and effect of poverty in wealthy CT

Not being able to afford a home in a suburban community is a common problem for many of Connecticut’s low-income residents, particularly people of color, because of the state’s longstanding and widespread lack of affordable housing. This disparity in the availability and quality of housing is one of the chief forces of division in modern society and both a cause and effect of poverty, experts say. Continue Reading →

Hayes raises about $1.3 million in her quest for congressional seat

WASHINGTON – Jahana Hayes, a political newcomer vying for the 5th District congressional seat, has pulled in nearly $1.3 million in campaign donations since she announced her candidacy in May. Some of that money came from political action committees representing special interests and from those Hayes hopes to call colleagues after the Nov. 6 elections, including House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi. Continue Reading →

Do magnet schools need white students to be great?

In the Hartford region, a difference in philosophies about whether segregation contributes to poor educational outcomes divides parents, educators and lawmakers. Most magnet schools have no problem attracting enough white students from the suburbs to go to school with city kids, but some struggle. This means seats in some schools are left open to maintain diversity – a reality that is causing a rift among neighbors about what should happen next. On Tuesday, a federal judge will consider whether the state must stop considering race when awarding seats. Continue Reading →