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Posted inMoney

FOI complaint seeks documents delving into fiscal stability panel’s work

Two progressive policy groups have charged the state’s fiscal stability commission with failing to disclose documents — including those tied to a nonprofit that funded key budgetary consultants for the panel. They are asking the legislature to put off acting on the panel’s recommendations until their request for the documents is resolved.

Posted inPolitics

An unlikely rebuke of the General Assembly over election laws

With a blandly titled “informational forum,” a Democratic state senator choreographed an unusual rebuke of the General Assembly and its leadership Friday, eliciting testimony about the systematic weakening of campaign finance laws in Connecticut, most recently by provisions inserted into the bipartisan budget adopted in special session last fall.

Posted inPolitics

CT GOP helps Trump mega-donors bypass campaign limits, legally

Some eye-popping numbers are listed in the Connecticut Republican Party’s latest finance report: On a single day, nearly $900,000 flowed from across the U.S. into its account, nearly doubling its receipts. But the money bounced to the Republican National Committee, a legal trick practiced by both parties to help megadonors evade contribution limits.

Posted inHealth, Politics

Wade faces subpoena in Cigna conflict of interest question

The Office of State Ethics is taking the rare step of seeking authority to subpoena personal financial information that Insurance Commissioner Katherine L. Wade has failed to provide the lawyer responsible for determining if Wade has a conflict of interest ruling on the merger of Anthem and Cigna. Wade’s lawyer says she has been responsive and suggests the conflict question is moot, because the state’s review is suspended until a federal anti-trust suit is resolved.

Posted inPolitics

Revolving door spins for Connecticut delegation

WASHINGTON — Many Connecticut lawmakers who have retired recently have become lobbyists. An analysis by The Connecticut Mirror shows that dozens of staffers for the state’s lawmakers have also swung through the revolving door, the term used for an ingrained, and growing, Washington phenomenon for when lawmakers and their staff leave Capitol Hill for more lucrative lobbying jobs.

Posted inPolitics

Malloy, Williams back national popular vote

Gov. Dannel P. Malloy and Senate President Pro Tem Donald E. Williams Jr., D-Brooklyn, endorsed legislation Monday that would have Connecticut join an interstate compact committing the state’s electoral votes to the winner of the national popular vote. The governor’s office announced the support of Malloy and Lt. Gov. Nancy Wyman as the legislature’s Government Administration […]