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Posted inMoney, Politics

Key budget players still aren’t talking as clock ticks on session

With just two and a half weeks left in the 2016 General Assembly session, the chief players in the state budget drama still haven’t begun talking — at a time negotiations normally would be in full swing. Gov. Dannel P. Malloy is frustrated with his fellow Democrats in the legislature’s majority — whose only plan for the new fiscal year was $340 million out of balance — and with a Republican minority that won’t issue a new plan.

Posted inMoney, Politics

Bye urges colleagues, Malloy to scale back town aid cuts

The Senate chair of the General Assembly’s budget-writing panel challenged her colleagues and Gov. Dannel P. Malloy on Thursday to ease the municipal aid cuts they are seeking — or watch one budget be rejected after another. Sen. Beth Bye also fears many cities and towns already are making plans to increase property tax rates based on the state budgets proposed over the past week.

Posted inMoney, Politics

Municipalities fear big CT deficits will nix promised state aid

In light of surging state budget deficits, municipal leaders were skeptical Tuesday that their communities would receive the hundreds of millions of dollars in state sales tax receipts owed them over the next three years. The Connecticut Conference of Municipalities also used their annual lobbying day at the Capitol to urge legislators to spare them from new mandates and to postpone and reform a new municipal spending cap.

Posted inMoney, Politics, Transportation

Advocates hope CT’s transportation woes will spur spending

While transportation advocates offered further evidence Tuesday that Connecticut’s aging, congested transportation system is weakening the economy, they remained uncertain whether that would translate into greater state investment in the problem. A new report from a Washington, D.C.-based advocacy group concluded congestion and aging infrastructure cost Connecticut residents in urban areas between $2,050 and $2,236 per year.