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Posted inCT Viewpoints

Saving jobs and protecting tourism is a winning combination for Connecticut

The recent groundbreaking for a casino just north of the Massachusetts border in Springfield promises to draw more customers from Connecticut than from their own region. Connecticut’s Mashantucket Pequot and Mohegan Tribes are working to remain competitive in this new environment with a strategically located, jointly run facility that will directly compete with new gaming options on our border. Last session, the Connecticut General Assembly allowed the tribes to work together and accept proposals from towns interested in hosting this new facility. The tribes have been good neighbors and friends to the state for 13 generations, and business partners for the past two decades. They are asking the state to support a plan to protect jobs, business and revenue. Doing so is a win-win for all.

Posted inCT Viewpoints

Let the Mashantucket Pequot and Mohegan tribes open satellite casinos

Today, we have two of the state’s largest employers and biggest tourist attractions willing to invest more than $300 million dollars in our state to protect 10,000 existing jobs. Connecticut, a state of 169 municipalities that have directly benefited from the billions of dollars in slot revenues contributed by the Tribes to the state’s coffers, can and must give the Mohegan and Mashantucket Pequot Tribes the ability to compete to protect their businesses. If Connecticut does not allow the tribes to take steps to protect their businesses and revenues, the state will lose thousands of additional jobs and hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue.

Posted inPolitics

Connecticut’s unlikely history of casinos gets a new chapter

Failing to slam the door on casino gambling in 1991, Gov. Lowell P. Weicker Jr. cut the deal in 1993 that both gave the industry a foundation and firmly capped its reach in Connecticut — until now. Today, the legislature’s Public Safety and Security Committee holds a public hearing on what appears to be the strongest attempt in two decades to expand casino gambling off tribal lands.