Mark Ojakian

Recent Posts

House panel cuts education budget, but not nearly as much as Trump

WASHINGTON — House appropriators rejected many of President Donald Trump’s proposed cuts to education, but trimmed some programs and eliminated others – including one that provides the state and local school districts with $25 million in teacher training grants each year. House appropriators also failed to adjust this year’s Pell grant awards for inflation, a move state officials say will cost Connecticut students $6 million in college financial aid next year. Continue Reading →

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Another day, another flare-up between Ojakian, CSCU faculty

After completing a whirlwind town-hall tour of all 17 campuses in the Connecticut State Colleges and Universities system, Mark Ojakian, the system’s president, was greeted by unwelcoming faculty in Hartford Thursday when he returned to meet with his governing board. Continue Reading →

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CSCU regents adopt tuition hikes, consolidation framework

Updated at 8:13 p.m.
The Board of Regents for Higher Education adopted tuition increases that will eliminate more than half the $35-million budget deficit the state’s largest public college system is facing in the next fiscal year. The board also adopted the framework of a plan to dramatically consolidate the administrative and operational structures of many of the system’s colleges. Continue Reading →

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Ojakian pitches sweeping consolidations to keep CSCU ‘viable’

The Board of Regents for Higher Education will be asked Thursday to endorse a framework for saving at least $41 million annually through the administrative and operational consolidations of institutions that have remained autonomous since the merger in 2011 of the state’s 12 community colleges, four regional state universities and the online college, Charter Oak. The system’s president, Mark Ojakian, said the present structure no longer is viable. Continue Reading →

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Tuition hikes blunt CSCU budget gap

The president of the state’s largest public college system said tuition increases spread over the next two years are necessary to help close a budget gap of at least $70 million over that time while still giving students the ability to handle and plan for future costs. Continue Reading →

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For third straight year, state college system freezes hiring

Connecticut State Colleges & Universities President Mark Ojakian is issuing an immediate hiring freeze for the system’s 17 schools and its central office, a spokeswoman said. Gov. Dannel P. Malloy’s proposed budget would cut the state’s block grant to the college system by $25 million. Continue Reading →

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Higher ed board gives Ojakian 3-year extension as president

Mark Ojakian, who took over as the leader of the state’s largest public college system amid turmoil last year, has won something his predecessors were unable to achieve – a contract extension from the system’s governing board. The extension brings no raise in his $335,000 salary. Continue Reading →

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Ojakian, saying CSCU needs stability, wants to stay at the helm

“You can’t have a president every one or two years and expect that you’re actually going to provide the best service to students and to our state,” President Mark Ojakian said during a recent wide-ranging interview in his Hartford office. “You just can’t do that.” Continue Reading →

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What cuts loom at your community college or regional university?

“This is a very challenging budget that we are looking at,” said Mark Ojakian, the president of the Connecticut State Colleges & Universities system. “Times of crisis are a time of opportunity. We are going to have to do business differently. We are not going to be able to sustain even this level of funding in the future. It’s going to be tough.” Continue Reading →

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College leaders decry proposed cuts; ‘It’s grim’ says Herbst

At many of the state’s public colleges – which collectively enroll 150,000 students – tuition could rise, course offerings would shrink, class sizes would increase, library hours would be cut and some degrees would no longer be offered, the state’s higher education leaders testified Wednesday. Continue Reading →

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