Jacqueline Rabe Thomas

Jacqueline won two first prizes from the national Education Writers Association for her work in 2012 – one in beat reporting for her overall education coverage, and the other in investigative reporting on a series of stories revealing questionable monetary and personnel actions taken by the Board of Regents for Higher Education. In 2016, she was a finalist in the EWA competition for single-topic coverage for her reporting on how schools are funded in Connecticut. Before coming to The Mirror, Jacqueline was a reporter, online editor and website developer for The Washington Post Co.’s Maryland newspaper chains. She has also worked for Congressional Quarterly and the Toledo Free Press. Jacqueline received an undergraduate degree in journalism from Bowling Green State University and a master’s in public policy from Trinity College. She and her husband, son and two dogs live in Hartford.

Jake Kara

Jake is a former managing editor of The Ridgefield Press, a Hersam Acorn newspaper. He worked for the community newspaper chain as a reporter and editor for five years before joining the Mirror staff. He studied professional writing at Western Connecticut State University and is a graduate student in computer science at Harvard Extension School.

Recent Posts

The state of CT’s public schools in charts

The state’s public education system has reached a pivotal time. The Connecticut Supreme Court is set to hear arguments today in a landmark school-funding case. And with the state facing major projected deficits for the foreseeable future, it might take an order from the high court for much more money to reach Connecticut’s most impoverished districts. The court will be hearing an appeal from a ruling in which Superior Court Judge Thomas Moukawsher found the state’s method of distributing aid to schools to be “irrational,” and thus unconstitutional. His ruling included a scathing indictment of the education students receive in the state’s most impoverished districts. Continue Reading →

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Unhappy with credit-freeze fees after Equifax breach? So is attorney general

Updated Sept. 15 at 3:15 p.m.
Consumers looking to protect themselves from identity theft following a massive data breach of credit report provider Equifax could face fees, thanks to a decade-old state law that has similar counterparts in many other states. Connecticut Attorney General George Jepsen thinks Equifax should be on the hook for those fees. Continue Reading →

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Poorest districts spared some ed funding cuts, still to be hit hard by others

In the absence of a state budget, Gov. Dannel P. Malloy has spared Connecticut’s most impoverished communities from losing their largest education grants, but there are plenty of other lesser grants these towns rely on that will be decimated or scaled back under his executive orders. Continue Reading →

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Judge: Magnet schools cannot be made more segregated

Filling empty seats with more black and Hispanic students from Hartford, a Superior Court judge ruled Friday, would erode the Connecticut Supreme Court’s landmark Sheff v. O’Neill desegregation decision, issued nearly 21 years ago, which found Hartford students “suffer daily” from the inequities caused by severe racial isolation. Continue Reading →

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