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Posted inEducation

Malloy confronts school inequities: ‘The civil rights issue of our time’

His first day on the job in January 2011, Gov. Dannel P. Malloy went before the General Assembly to declare that the state was facing an economic and employment crisis, created in part by “a lack of educational resources.” He then spent the next eight years of his tenure in what he recently described as “pitched battles” with “weak-kneed” Democrats over various education reforms he believed were long overdue.

Posted inInvestigations

Denied: A look into inmate health care

Prison doctors made a series of requests in October 2017 for patients to see specialists. One inmate had diabetes and was losing sensation in his feet. Another needed special shoes because all of his toes had been amputated due to frostbite. A third patient’s prosthetic foot was worn out with tears and holes and needed to be repaired.

It appears they were all denied care. But the state can’t say for sure.

Posted inCities & Towns, Education, Health, Housing, Money, News, Politics, Transportation

Connecticut faces long crawl out of wealth extremes, crushing debt

Whether it’s expanding access to education and health care, rebuilding roads and cities or making taxes fairer, leaders have many ideas to reduce wealth inequality and promote prosperity. But they remain uncertain about how to solve this crisis while Connecticut simultaneously grapples with a historic debt burden that also threatens its future.

Posted inEducation

Increase in minority teachers not keeping pace with influx of minority students

First the good news: hundreds more minorities have become teachers over the last 10 years following several changes that made it easier to become an educator in Connecticut. Now the bad news. The growth hasn’t kept pace with the influx of Hispanic and Latino students entering public schools and those students are now less likely to have a teacher that looks like them, a review of state data by CT Mirror has found.

Posted inEnergy & Environment

Connecticut’s vanishing shoreline: Towns trying to beat the odds

Shoreline resiliency against sea level rise and flooding in Connecticut is largely in the hands of local governments. But with money tight and local budgets reliant on the taxes shoreline properties generate, efforts to protect coastal communities from climate change have been slow and underfunded. Some communities, however, are making more progress than others.

Posted inHealth

As DCF’s Katz bows out, the risky world of child protection awaits new administration

Joette Katz, who served under Gov. Dannel P. Malloy for eight years, is resigning next month after what is believed to be one of the longest tenures leading a state child-protection agency in the nation. But it wasn’t always easy. Despite Malloy’s loyalty to her, Katz’s abrasive personality, refusal to back down from controversial decisions, and her decision to march the child protection agency in a new and sometimes perilous direction, resulted in a rocky eight years.

Posted inPolitics

Behind Democrats’ win, a senator and one million phone calls

Jenna Shapiro woke up miserable the day after Donald J. Trump’s election in 2016. The daughter of Democratic activists, Shapiro had canvassed for Hillary Clinton in New Hampshire and worked on phone banks at Wesleyan, where she was a senior contemplating a career in teaching. “I felt like I hadn’t done enough, not nearly enough,” Shapiro said. “I never want to wake up after another election believing I hadn’t done everything I could for a candidate I believed in.” She woke up happy this year, having put off teaching to help run the Democratic GOTV campaign in Connecticut.

Posted inEducation

Do magnet schools need white students to be great?

In the Hartford region, a difference in philosophies about whether segregation contributes to poor educational outcomes divides parents, educators and lawmakers. Most magnet schools have no problem attracting enough white students from the suburbs to go to school with city kids, but some struggle. This means seats in some schools are left open to maintain diversity – a reality that is causing a rift among neighbors about what should happen next. On Tuesday, a federal judge will consider whether the state must stop considering race when awarding seats.

Posted inHealth, Money, Politics

Change is coming for nonprofit human service providers, but will it make or break them?

It is a time of reckoning for Connecticut’s private, nonprofit social services. After two decades of flat or reduced funding from its chief client — state government — community-based agencies are struggling to retain both their programs and the low-paid staff who deliver care for thousands of poor, disabled and mentally-ill adults and children.