Paul Stern

Paul Stern

Paul has more than 40 years of reporting and editing experience at newspapers in New Jersey, Florida and Connecticut. He worked 22 years at the Hartford Courant in various editing roles including as deputy state editor, assistant editor of Northeast Magazine, and as an associate editor at Courant.com. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Rutgers in 1972; and, in 2010, completed a training program in culinary arts at Manchester Community College.

Recent Posts

We will not shut up

Dear Friends,
Today, the Institute for Nonprofit News [to which the Connecticut Mirror belongs] joins journalists across the country in asking you, the public, to stand up for your rights to free speech and an open government. This started as a campaign by the Boston Globe to ask the President of the United States to knock off attacking the news media. But the President’s attacks on the press aren’t ultimately about the press. “The press” is just journalists who work as your eyes and ears in places you can’t be. The press is the people you send into rooms to witness what your government is doing and tell you about it. Continue Reading →

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The sound and the fury of Connecticut politics

Only two days until the Connecticut primaries — and it shows. The past week has been a series of candidate debates, press conferences, appearances, TV ads and countermeasures all intended to win the hearts and minds of party members across the state. Today will feature plenty of politicking, too, when students from Parkland, Fla., host a rally in Newtown opposing gun violence and encouraging young people to register to vote and support their cause. Continue Reading →

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Depression affects Connecticut women much more than men

Depression is the leading cause of disability worldwide, according to the World Health Organization, and affects women at about twice the rate that it does men. In Connecticut, 21.4 percent of women report experiencing depression, compared with 13.4 percent of men, according to 2015 Department of Public Health data. Millennial women in the state experience depression four more days in an average month than their male counterparts, the Status of Women data project reported this year. Women are more likely to use mental health services than men, but studies consistently show that the majority of Americans with depression go untreated. In the podcast below, sponsored by ConnectiCare, Colleen Shaddox discusses depression and pathways to better mental health with Yale’s Carolyn Mazure, and NYTimes best-selling author Luanne Rice. Continue Reading →

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