Paul Stern

Paul Stern

Paul has more than 40 years of reporting and editing experience at newspapers in New Jersey, Florida and Connecticut. He worked 22 years at the Hartford Courant in various editing roles including as deputy state editor, assistant editor of Northeast Magazine, and as an associate editor at Courant.com. A trained chef, he and his wife are the owner-operators of the Stone Arches Bed and Breakfast in Mansfield.

Recent Posts

Trump’s inauguration paid Trump’s company — with Ivanka in the middle

When it came out this year that President Donald Trump’s inaugural committee raised and spent unprecedented amounts, people wondered where all that money went. It turns out one beneficiary was Trump himself. The inauguration paid the Trump Organization for rooms, meals and event space at the company’s Washington hotel, according to interviews as well as internal emails and receipts reviewed by WNYC and ProPublica. Continue Reading →

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Nurse denied life insurance because she carries naloxone

Bloodwork was supposed to be the last step in Isela’s application for life insurance. But when she arrived at the lab, her appointment had been canceled. “That was my first warning,” Isela said. She contacted her insurance agent and was told her application was denied because something on her medication list indicated that Isela uses drugs. Isela, a registered nurse who works in an addiction treatment program at Boston Medical Center, scanned her med list. It showed a prescription for the opioid-reversal drug naloxone. Continue Reading →

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What it will mean if Betsy DeVos rolls back the Obama school discipline rule

Two years ago, it seemed like scrapping Obama-era guidance around school suspensions might be at the top of Betsy DeVos’s to-do list as education secretary. The rules encouraged schools to limit suspensions and expulsions, and have been supported by progressives and civil rights groups. But they have been heavily criticized by conservatives, who say they’ve made schools less safe. Still, the guidelines have stayed in place, even as conversations about school safety have taken on new intensity. Continue Reading →

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Outreach targets asthma hot spots, but more help is needed

Robert Carmon had a rough start to life. Shortly after birth he developed asthma, a chronic disease that causes inflammation in the lungs and difficulty breathing. His attacks were so severe as an infant that his parents rushed him to the emergency room practically every week. Today, at age 7, Robert’s asthma has stabilized. With the help of his dad, Chaz Carmon, he inhales a steroid-based medicine each morning and evening, and he carries a rescue inhaler in his backpack in case an asthma attack comes in school or elsewhere. Continue Reading →

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Elections and holiday over, now it’s time to get re-organized.

With the elections over, (with one notable exception) Connecticut began getting re-organized last week. And it took some time off for the Thanksgiving holiday, too. Early in the week, Gov.-elect Ned Lamont returned from an orientation for new governors promising to assemble a top-notch group of departmental appointees. He and Lt. Gov.-elect Susan Bysiewicz have scheduled a policy summit for Tuesday where the plan is to “bring together some of Connecticut’s sharpest minds to help Susan and me make our vision for the state a reality,” Lamont said. One element of his plan will involve making what he calls “structural changes” needed to bring the state’s deficit spending habit under control. Continue Reading →

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Midwives could be key to reversing maternal mortality trends

The Connecticut Childbirth & Women’s Center in Danbury is a 50-minute drive from Evelyn DeGraf’s home in Westchester, N.Y. Pregnant with her second child, the 37-year-old didn’t hesitate to make the drive — she wanted her birth to be attended by a midwife, not a doctor. DeGraf believed midwifery care to be more personal and less rushed than that delivered by an obstetrician. Continue Reading →

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Gov. Malloy: Thanksgiving — a time to put aside differences

In this, his last Thanksgiving message to Connecticut, Gov. Dannel Malloy says: “I am especially thankful this year to the residents of Connecticut who have allowed me to serve as Governor for the past eight years. Together, we have braved major natural disasters, endured unthinkable tragedy, and recovered from the most significant economic downturn since the Great Depression.” Continue Reading →

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In politics and state budgeting, the numbers count

It was all about the numbers in Connecticut last week – counted in votes and dollars. Fates were sealed for candidates of previously undecided elections. The resolution of the state’s budget deficit, on the other hand, will be Gov.-elect Ned Lamont’s (and the new legislature’s) ongoing challenge even though the numbers appear to be improving. Continue Reading →

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